Justice Care and Opportunities Department

Care First Community
Investment (CFCI)

Justice Care and Opportunities Department

CFCI

Community Listening Sessions for CFCI Year 3 Spending Plan

Would you like to learn more about the Care First Community Engagement (CFCI) process or provide input on what your community needs? These sessions are designed to inform the community and engage a broad coalition of stakeholders to gather community input and help develop the CFCI Year 3 Spending Plan. Your participation in promoting CFCI is important to ensure we reach as many residents as possible in LA County.

Listening Sessions will be held in February 2023 in multiple locations throughout LA County and one session will be held virtually over Zoom. The Community Survey will be available to complete online February through March.

Community Listening Sessions

Virtual on Zoom

Feb 8, 2023, at 6:00 p.m.

Register HERE!

Lynwood

Feb. 15, 2023, at 5:30 p.m.

Register HERE!

Compton

Feb. 16, 2023, at 5:30 p.m.

Register HERE!

Pomona

Feb. 18, 2023 at 12:00 p.m.

Register HERE!

Long Beach

Feb. 21, 2023, at 5:30 p.m.

Register HERE!

Click here for toolkits that provide sample messaging and images.

Year 2 Care First Community Investment (CFCI)
Spending Plan Approved by Board of Supervisors

The Board of Supervisors approved a $100 million Care First Community Investment (CFCI) Spending Plan—with Year 2 allocations to further advance Los Angeles County’s Care First, Jails Last vision with direct community investments and funding for alternatives to incarceration.

This second annual investment of $100 million advances the County’s commitment to build up to the full CFCI set aside by 2024 and it adds to the first year’s CFCI investment of $187.7 million, which includes American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding. The total CFCI investment is now $287.7 million.

The approved spending plan funds all 22 programs recommended by the Care First Community Investment Advisory Committee. The 23-member committee held marathon public meetings and engaged the community via virtual and in-person listening sessions, a community survey and the engagement of trusted community-based organizations.

The plan was developed with an equity lens, with a primary focus on chronically under-resourced communities to address negative outcomes caused by racially-driven criminal justice inequities and long-term community economic disinvestment.

Highlights of the funding plan include:

  • More than $45 million will be dedicated to housing, with more than $42 million dedicated to permanent housing for the County’s most vulnerable populations.
  • More than $40 million will be administered by a third-party administrator with the majority of funds passing through to community-based organizations. County departments will be encouraged to distribute most of their funding directly to community-based providers as well.
  • Nearly $20 million will be dedicated to programs prioritizing youth development.
  • More than $14.5 million will fund violence prevention.
  • More than $11 million will fund programs for non-carceral diversion or to support residents returning to the community after incarceration.
  • More than $8 million will fund education or job training.

A summary of the Care First Community Investment spending plan is here

Details of programs funded are here

The CFCI Advisory Committee’s report and recommendations are here

The board letter and relevant documents are here.

Year 2 Care First Community Investment (CFCI) Spending Plan Approved by Board of Supervisors

The Board of Supervisors approved a $100 million Care First Community Investment (CFCI) Spending Plan—with Year 2 allocations to further advance Los Angeles County’s Care First, Jails Last vision with direct community investments and funding for alternatives to incarceration.

This second annual investment of $100 million advances the County’s commitment to build up to the full CFCI set aside by 2024 and it adds to the first year’s CFCI investment of $187.7 million, which includes American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding. The total CFCI investment is now $287.7 million.

The approved spending plan funds all 22 programs recommended by the Care First Community Investment Advisory Committee. The 23-member committee held marathon public meetings and engaged the community via virtual and in-person listening sessions, a community survey and the engagement of trusted community-based organizations.

The plan was developed with an equity lens, with a primary focus on chronically under-resourced communities to address negative outcomes caused by racially-driven criminal justice inequities and long-term community economic disinvestment.

Highlights of the funding plan include:

  • More than $45 million will be dedicated to housing, with more than $42 million dedicated to permanent housing for the County’s most vulnerable populations.
  • More than $40 million will be administered by a third-party administrator with the majority of funds passing through to community-based organizations. County departments will be encouraged to distribute most of their funding directly to community-based providers as well.
  • Nearly $20 million will be dedicated to programs prioritizing youth development.
  • More than $14.5 million will fund violence prevention.
  • More than $11 million will fund programs for non-carceral diversion or to support residents returning to the community after incarceration.
  • More than $8 million will fund education or job training.

    A summary of the Care First Community Investment spending plan is here

    Details of programs funded are here

    The CFCI Advisory Committee’s report and recommendations are here

    The board letter and relevant documents are here.

    For more information about Care First Community Investment,
    visit the Alternatives to Incarceration website.

    Transformative Year 1
    $187.7 Million “Care First Community Investment” Spending Plan Invests in Equity and Community

    The Board of Supervisors approved an unprecedented $187.7 million spending package to advance its care first, jails last vision with a series of direct community investments and funding for alternatives to incarceration—accelerating the transformative process of creating a more just and equitable Los Angeles County for all residents.

    The spending plan fully embraces the spirit of the voter-approved Measure J and also takes the innovative step of leveraging one-time funding from the American Rescue Plan to ensure a strong foundation as programs ramp up and full funding levels are reached by 2024.

    The plan includes a $100 million year one down payment for Board-approved programs spelled out in Measure J and now known as “Care First Community Investment” programs, and also leverages $87.7 million from the American Rescue Fund for a wide range of supportive, complementary programs. These include interim and permanent supportive housing, grants to community-based organizations, and employment opportunities for adults and youth.

    The approved spending plan has broad crossover with the Measure J Re-imagine LA Advisory Committee’s recommendations and meets or exceeds 91 percent of the committee’s recommendations and funds 29 new or expanded programs (click here to view the spending plan).

    The plan was developed with an equity lens, with a primary focus on chronically under-resourced communities to address negative outcomes caused by racially-driven criminal justice inequities and long-term community economic disinvestment.

    Highlights of the funding plan include:

    • $42 million to support the closure of Men’s Central Jail
    • $8 million for community-based pretrial services in highly impacted communities, replacing law-enforcement supervision and pretrial incarceration for eligible individuals
    • $20.9 million to support youth at risk of involvement with the justice system or already involved in the justice system
    CFCI
    • $16 million for housing and related services to meet a variety of needs including for people experiencing homelessness with complex health needs; people with substance use disorder and at-risk and system-impacted youth and transition-age youth
    • $15 million to support residents returning to the community after incarceration
    • $9 million in supports for people experiencing substance use disorder and to prevent drug-related harm and death

    A summary of the Care First Community Investment spending plan is here.
    Details of programs funded are here.

    In a separate action, the Board of Supervisors modified the Measure J Advisory Committee to the Los Angeles County Care First & Community Investment Advisory Committee (CFCI Advisory Committee), a 24-member board made up of a variety of community representatives, people with lived experiences, County department leaders and labor representatives. The new iteration of the advisory committee will continue to advise on related spending and will support the County’s creation of an online dashboard to monitor Care First Community Investment data.

    CFCI

    Transformative Year 1
    $187.7 Million “Care First Community Investment” Spending Plan Invests in Equity and Community

    The Board of Supervisors approved an unprecedented $187.7 million spending package to advance its care first, jails last vision with a series of direct community investments and funding for alternatives to incarceration—accelerating the transformative process of creating a more just and equitable Los Angeles County for all residents.

    he spending plan fully embraces the spirit of the voter-approved Measure J and also takes the innovative step of leveraging one-time funding from the American Rescue Plan to ensure a strong foundation as programs ramp up and full funding levels are reached by 2024.

    The plan includes a $100 million year one down payment for Board-approved programs spelled out in Measure J and now known as “Care First Community Investment” programs, and also leverages $87.7 million from the American Rescue Fund for a wide range of supportive, complementary programs. These include interim and permanent supportive housing, grants to community-based organizations, and employment opportunities for adults and youth.

    The approved spending plan has broad crossover with the Measure J Re-imagine LA Advisory Committee’s recommendations and meets or exceeds 91 percent of the committee’s recommendations and funds 29 new or expanded programs (click here to view the spending plan).

    The plan was developed with an equity lens, with a primary focus on chronically under-resourced communities to address negative outcomes caused by racially-driven criminal justice inequities and long-term community economic disinvestment.

    Highlights of the funding plan include:

    • $42 million to support the closure of Men’s Central Jail
    • $8 million for community-based pretrial services in highly impacted communities, replacing law-enforcement supervision and pretrial incarceration for eligible individuals
    • $20.9 million to support youth at risk of involvement with the justice system or already involved in the justice system
    • $16 million for housing and related services to meet a variety of needs including for people experiencing homelessness with complex health needs; people with substance use disorder and at-risk and system-impacted youth and transition-age youth
    • $15 million to support residents returning to the community after incarceration
    • $9 million in supports for people experiencing substance use disorder and to prevent drug-related harm and death

        A summary of the Care First Community Investment spending plan is here.
        Details of programs funded are here.

        In a separate action, the Board of Supervisors modified the Measure J Advisory Committee to the Los Angeles County Care First & Community Investment Advisory Committee (CFCI Advisory Committee), a 24-member board made up of a variety of community representatives, people with lived experiences, County department leaders and labor representatives. The new iteration of the advisory committee will continue to advise on related spending and will support the County’s creation of an online dashboard to monitor Care First Community Investment data.